A Brief History

The Vergennes Citizen traces its roots to the 'Vermont Aurora,' founded in 1824 in Vergennes, Vermont by Gamaliel Small. The small city was home to a surprising number of newspapers in the 19th century, including the 'Vergennes Independent,' the 'Vergennes Citizen,' and 'The Vergennes Vermonter' (founded by Rufus Griswold, who would go on to become Edgar Allen Poe's literary executor. Over the years, the papers would acquire each other, eventually unifying as 'The Enterprise and Vermonter.'

 The Vergennes Citizen as it appeared in 1855.

The Vergennes Citizen as it appeared in 1855.

In 1980, New Yorkers Edward Williams and Douglas Lazarus purchased the Enterprise and rebranded it as "The Vergennes Citizen," an illustrated weekly that utilized William's sly writing style and eschewed photographs in favor of Lazarus's illustrations of Vergennesians from all walks of life. The illustrated weekly ran until March, 1984.

 The Vergennes Citizen in 1982. 

The Vergennes Citizen in 1982. 

In 2017, Doug's son and native Vergennesian Matt Lazarus purchased the paper from Williams and brought it back to life after a brief, 33-year hiatus. In keeping with Vergennes' previous reputation as "The Smallest City in America," the paper itself is miniature The little paper that wouldn't stay dead is now a blog, and quite literally, the smallest city newspaper in America.

 The revamped Vergennes Citizen

The revamped Vergennes Citizen